Books

Misogyny Online: A Short (and Brutish) History

Misogyny Online: a Short (and Brutish) History is a rigorous, necessary and at times terrifying exploration of one of the most pressing and rapidly growing forms of harassment and abuse of women and girls today. Dr Jane’s interrogation of the rhetoric of sexualised, gendered violence and the rise of multi-perpetrator attacks on individual women using digital technology is a must-read for a greater understanding of this phenomenon and its impact on democracy, culture and the individual. Tara Moss, UNICEF National Ambassador for Child Survival, feminist commentator and human rights advocate

If R.D. Laing was correct in saying “few books are forgivable,” then it’s surely the case that fewer still are necessary. This book is. Emma Jane has taken some well-worn media and cultural studies orthodoxies and subjected them to a series of trenchant, persuasive, and often laugh-out-loud criticisms. People analysing cybersphere culture and discourse cannot afford to ignore this book. Associate Professor Chris Fleming, School of Humanities and Communication Arts, Western Sydney University

Cultural Studies: Theory and Practice

“This book presents a magisterial overview of Cultural Studies, and of studies of culture more broadly. It synthesizes a bewildering range of writers and ideas into a comprehensible narrative. It’s respectful to the history of ideas and completely cutting edge. I learned a lot – you will too.”
- Professor Alan McKee, University of Technology Sydney

“The role of culture in spatial, digital and political settings is a vital aspect of contemporary life. Barker and Jane provide an excellent introduction to Cultural Studies’ relationship to these core issues, both through a clear explanation of key concepts and thinkers, alongside well chosen examples and essential questions.”
- Dr David O’Brien, Goldsmiths, University of London

With over 40,000 copies sold, Cultural Studies: Theory and Practice is a useful companion for students of cultural studies, culture and society, media and cultural theory, popular culture and cultural sociology.

Modern Conspiracy: The Importance of Being Paranoid

While conspiracy theory is often characterized in terms of the collapse of objectivity and Enlightenment reason, Modern Conspiracy traces the important role of conspiracy in the formation of the modern world: the scientific revolution, social contract theory, political sovereignty, religious paranoia and mass communication media. Rather than seeing the imminent death of Enlightenment reason and a regression to a new Dark Age in conspiratorial thinking, Modern Conspiracy suggests that many characteristic features of conspiracies tap very deeply into the history of the Enlightenment: its vociferous critique of established authorities and a conception of political sovereignty fuelled by fear of counter-plots, for example. Perhaps, ultimately, conspiracy theory affords us a renewed opportunity to reflect on our very relationship to the truth itself.

Bali: Paradise Lost?


Window burning, opium abuse, slave trading, royal live rhinoceros rituals…. Bali’s history is a fascinating place to visit but you wouldn’t necessarily want to live there. Tom, E. (2006), Bali – Paradise Lost?, Pluto Press, North Melbourne.

“Beautifully written and magically structured, Emma Tom’s Bali: Paradise Lost? is an evocative, funny, and honest look at the on-again, off-again love affair between Australians and the Indonesian island we like to call our own.”
- Linda Jaivin, author of The Monkey and the Dragon.

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Something About Mary

A wry and unorthodox royal biography which questions the enduring cultural fascination with the (sometimes quite painful) process of princessification.

Tom, E. (2005), Something About Mary, Pluto Press, North Melbourne..

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Attack of the Fifty-Foot Hormones

This sanity-boosting pregnancy survival guide is the result of hundreds of interviews with sympathetic professionals and pregnant women generous enough to reveal how they stayed sunny-side up despite spending nine months in tracky daks the size of North Korea. Here are printoutable versions of the book’s five User Guides…

USER GUIDE #1: What NOT To Say To Someone Who Is Trying To Get Pregnant But Who Hasn’t Had Any Luck Yet

USER GUIDE #2: Pregnancy Do’s and Don’t’s for Friends, Family Members and Busybodies on Trains

USER GUIDE #3: Partners — What You Can Do To Help (Or At Least Not Further Infuriate) The Large, Pregnant Lady In Your Life

USER GUIDE #4: The Big D

USER GUIDE #5: Birth Etiquette For Support Folk

Tom, E. (2009), Attack of the Fifty-Foot Hormones, HarperCollins, Australia..

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Babewatch


A PGR-rated collection of third-wave feministing for refractory girls.

Tom, E. (1998), Babewatch, Hodder Headline, Australia, New Zealand.

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FICTION
Deadset

A slapstick crime novel narrated by a dead school girl. Deadset won the 1998 Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Asia and the South Pacific for Best First Novel.

Tom, E. (1997), Deadset, (fiction), Random House, Australia.

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Evidence

An excruciatingly autobiographical novel about being a miserable 14-year-old in rural suburbia and wondering whether it is better to pass or fail The Frigid Test. Someone also gets burned alive. Emma Jane wrote Evidence with some help from her government in the form of an Australian Council grant.

Tom, E. (2002), Evidence, (fiction), HarperCollins, Australia. .